Pro-Tips: How To Use Google Calendar


my google calendar

Here at Spire & Co, we know you’re pretty busy. Between scheduling that group project meeting to filling out internship applications, it can be pretty tough to keep everything straight. While we may be major fans of a perfectly organized planner, nothing can beat the practicality of Google Calendars.

Google Calendars is awesome because it can sync to your email, your smartphone, and your laptop. While we know everyone is probably pretty capable of picking their preferred display and adding their own events, there are a few nuances in Google Calendars that will help you get the most out of this app.

Adding Details to Your Event

Google Calendars is able to add so many details to your event, from color coding it to linking Google Maps directions. After double clicking on your selected date or time, you’re going to get a bunch of options to add about your event. You should definitely start with giving your event a title (like, “pick up Dad from the airport”). From there, you can completely customize the details.

Toward the bottom of your window you’re going to see all of your color options – if color coding is your thing, here’s your chance! You also have the option of adding a location to your event. So, if on the 18th you’re picking up Dad from the airport, maybe you want to put the airport’s location in there. Now, when the 18th rolls around, you can click on the location and get Google maps directions to your event.

Inviting Friends to Your Event

Maybe you’re throwing a party, or maybe you’re trying to get your project group together. Either way, Google Calendars has got your back.

Remember when we customized your event with colors and location? In that same window, you can invite your pals. Simply click “Add guests” and begin typing your friends’ emails in. And don’t worry – even if they don’t use Google Calendars or Gmail, they will still receive an email invitation to the event.

Sharing Your Calendar

One of our favorite features on Google Calendar is sharing. This feature allows you to send your calendar to anyone with an email address (even if they’re not on Gmail). This is awesome for roommates to know who has a big event, or to share with your family so they know when things start getting pretty busy (like during midterms).

To get sharing, go to your regular calendar display. On the left-hand side of your screen, you’ll see a drop-down option called “My Calendars.” Click on the down arrow, and then select “settings.” From there, you’ll see all of your different calendars. Find the calendar that you want to share, and click “Share This Calendar.” Then set your calendar as public and type in the email addresses of those with whom you want to share.

Selecting Notification Settings

What good is a digital calendar if it can’t even remind you of an event? Google Calendars is like the alarm clock you don’t need to set. To edit your notification settings, click on the little gear in the upper right-hand corner of your screen, select “settings,” and click on the “calendars” tab. From there, find the calendar you want to work with, and click “edit notifications.” From there you can customize every aspect of your notifications down to email and pop-up notifications. You can even select an option that gives you a daily agenda straight to your inbox every morning to fill you in on that day’s activities.

Adding Your To-Do List

It really seems like calendars and to-do lists go hand-in-hand, right? To add your to-do list to your Google Calendar, go to the left-hand sidebar on your window where it says “My Calendars.” Beneath that, you’ll see an option called “Tasks.” Click on that word, and you should see a to-do list load on the right-hand sidebar just waiting for you to add things.

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Sara Heath

word lover. chicken nugget eater. bear cuddler. | As seen on Her Campus, Unwritten, Huffington Post, Thought Catalog | www.mynameisnotsarah.com | @_stuffsarasays

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