Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Calcium


Everything You Needed To Know About Calcium

Calcium is one of the elements that is one of the most important to include in your diet. It can be found in several products, most well known is dairy even though it can be found in other foods as well, such as leafy greens. But there is a lot more to calcium than just drinking enough milk!

It strengthens bones.

Calcium is the mineral responsible for ensuring that you have healthy bones. Because most of where it is stored in the body is in the bones, it is essential to keeping your skeleton up to par and therefore being able to support your body and protect your internal organs. Without enough calcium in the body through diet, calcium can begin to be leaked from the bones and cause pores in them, a disease called Osteoporosis. This can lead to brittle bones which fracture more easily. Keeping strong bones is extremely important and is directly related to a diet which includes enough calcium.

It helps your blood clot.

The calcium in our bodies works with other minerals to enable blood to form cloths. So, when you get a cut the blood can clot together and keep your from bleeding out, losing all of your blood, and dying. The clotting mechanism isn’t just important with cuts and scrapes, it is important for when we get bruises, which is internal bleeding. The clotting mechanism keeps all of the blood from being able to continue being circulated in the body, even though the blood is still technically in the body. Calcium is extremely important with this regard because it works to help keep everyone alive.

It helps nerves work properly.

An important cation that allows nerves to function properly at a nervous system level is calcium. There are, of course other cations that work with the calcium. However, without it, we would never be able to send or receive nerve impulses to the rest of the body. Without the sending and receiving of nerve impulses, nothing we do could ever happen, other than having a heart that beats because of the myogenic cells, although the heart also needs calcium to function properly. Any real level of thinking and movement in the body, even that which is involuntary, occurs because of calcium.

It allows muscle contractions and relaxation.

On a muscular level, calcium is one of the most important cations to exist. It binds to different parts of the muscle which ultimately allow for the contraction and relaxation of the muscle to occur. Without it, our muscles never would be able to move in the first place, nor would the muscles of any other organism contain muscles. This is extremely important to all movement in the body.

You can lose calcium through many things in the body.

Many interactions in the body, such as simply urinating and sweating, can cause a loss of calcium. This is because when the body wants to lose excess solutes, it must also lose water and vice versa. So, it important that you replenish the calcium you lose every day.This can be done by taking calcium tablets or just a simple multivitamin. This can also be done by eating foods which are high in calcium. These include, of course, dairy, but also fish with soft bones such as salmon and sardines. If you eat any grains, they do not have a significant amount of calcium to provide, but they can help to supplement small amounts of calcium that you may not have gotten in your day. Other foods, such as broccoli and kale will provide the needed calcium to your diet if you are lactose intolerant or a vegan.

It is extremely important to get the correct amount of calcium in your diet daily. It’s about 1000 milligrams for teenage and young women. Make sure you make it a key part of your day to day life to take in the amount of calcium you need! It keeps your body going!

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Micaela Stevenson

Micaela is a Wellness and Feminism columnist at Spire and Co. She is also a sophomore premed student double majoring in Biochemistry and Women and Gender Studies with a minor in Health and Illnesses at Eastern Michigan University. Her dream is to graduate with honors and attend the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and to become a perinatal and fetal surgeon. She loves to watch Netflix, bake, do research, and eat lots of macaroni!

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